We Hear You

We Hear You

“Younger adults are at a greater risk for experiencing depressive symptoms compared to older Latinos.”
We Hear You

We Hear You

“An official report from the Center of Disease Control and Prevention reported in 2009 that nearly 15% of Hispanic teens had attempted suicide the year before compared to 10% of all city high school girls.”
We Hear You

We Hear You

“Perceived discrimination and depressed emotion are highly linked in Latino adolescents.”
We Hear You

We Hear You

“11% of Hispanic girls across the country admitted a suicide attempt.”

Immigration & Acculturation

Many individuals living in the U.S. were not born here, emigrating from countries all over the world. The Latino/a population represents people who moved to the U.S. from places like Mexico, Guatemala, Chile, and other countries in Central and South America. When moving to a different country, a lot of things are left behind – like family, friends, homes, and a certain way of living. The journey to the U.S. can be difficult, causing feelings of loss and anger, and it may not be easy to get used to the new life in this country.  The process of learning about a new culture and feeling like you fit in is part of the Acculturation process.

Although it may be common to feel some sadness, loneliness, anger or anxiety when doing or trying something new, sometimes these feelings can take over our lives and stop us from doing things that we would normally do.  Making new friends, exploring a new city, feeling like you belong and going to school may become harder to do because we are not feeling comfortable or like ourselves.  When things get really tough we might just wish things can go back to “normal” or that we could go back home, but that might not be an option.  Some common questions and feelings we might have include:

  • I hate this place. What can I do?
  • I feel so lost. How can I feel better?
  • I don’t want to be here. Will things get easier?
  • I feel so alone. No one understands me!
  • I don’t understand and no one understands me!

These are all questions and emotions that we may have when we are in this situation, and that’s why we are here!  We Hear You, Te Escuchamos – and you are not alone! Questions and feelings like these are all things that we can talk about with a counselor.  Whether you are at school or at a community agency, seeking special time with a counselor gives you a safe space to talk about these things without feeling weird, judged, or misunderstood.

To get more information on where to find someone to talk to click here!

Read More:

Introduction

Identity

Discrimination

Family

LGBTQ

Relationships

Religion

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